Dual-boot Guide

Courtesy: LinuxBSDos.com

  • Dual-booting does not imply installing on the same hard drive. If your computer has two hard drives, you can install both operating systems on separate hard drives.
  • If you are dual-booting between Windows and a Linux or BSD distribution, Windows should be the first operating system installed on the hard drive.
  • If dual-booting between Windows and Linux on a computer with two hard drives, Windows should be installed on the first drive.
  • When dual-booting between two Linux distribtions, make sure that the first one installed is not using LVM, the Linux Logical Volume Manager. Why? Because the installer of Linux distributions that lack support for LVM will generally not “see” the other distro if it is installed using an LVM-based partitioning scheme. For example, if you plan on dual-booting Ubuntu or Linux Mint and Fedora, which uses LVM by default, install Ubuntu or Mint first, then install Fedora.
  • When running in Linux or BSD in a dual boot configuration, you can always copy or access your documents from the other operating system. A few Linux distributions, like Pardus and Mandriva, even offer a graphical migration tool that makes it very easy to migrate or copy your documents over. For instance, if dual-booting between Windows and Mandriva or Pardus Linux ,and you working on the Linux side, you can use the distro’s migration tool to copy your documents on the Windows side to the Linux side.
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